The Power in PowerShell

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This afternoon I updated a piece of software we use for instruction and classroom management on 37 servers. The software is actually a service, while its teacher and student versions are installed on the individual classroom machines via an auto update function within the service. 

In a situation that many of us as Systems Administrators have been in, I would have normally did an RDP to each server, copied the service install, the teacher and student install to the server and ran the service MSI to install it. That would be on average 5 minutes on each server for a total time of just over 3 hours. 

To avoid that we now have PowerShell and the Power of PowerShell. I wrote a script, tested it on a Dev server until I felt comfortable that is was debugged and then ran it on the production servers. The writing of the script took a half hour, testing a half hour and running it to completion from my desk in a PowerShell console took 4 minutes. 

Yes, that’s 4 minutes to run the script to completion on all 37 servers. Add the writing and testing time and you get a total of one hour and four minutes. In my field, educational K12 we have maintenance Windows that run after school and district hours to avoid as much interruption to learning as possible. If I was to do the updates the manual method I would have had to start at 4:30pm on a Friday for 3 hours. While that would have been overtime, I would rather not stay after already working an eight hour day on a Friday if I don’t have to. 

The Power of PowerShell made it so that my total time invested in the actual update was less than 10 minutes which includes the four the script took. The hour of writing and testing the script was during my normal work day so they don’t count. Because school is out, I was able to get the school based technology support personnel to agree to not be using the servers to let me start at 4pm instead of 4:30pm at the end of our day. 

That means I was able to update a major tool of our classroom learning and IT software management during the work day in 4 minutes without any real disruption to anyone. Now that is what I consider good time management. 

Overall, I saved the district 3 hours of overtime. At the same time I saved myself from an extra 3 hours at work on top of the eight I was already working and I was able to use them with my family. I also now have a script that I can use with a multitude of software installs to save even more time. That’s the Power of PowerShell. 

Before I close I want to address the people that say I’ve hurt my value, made something that can replace me, or left pay in the bosses pockets. Well, to me those thoughts are from people who are insecure with themselves and are only looking out for themselves. I helped my value by making something that lets me spend more time on a different project that will help the students who I’m working for. I’ve also saved the district money that can be spent somewhere else that will help the students who I’m working for. We have a job not because of ourselves, but because of the end user. PowerShell makes that possible for me. 

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One thought on “The Power in PowerShell

    […] of technology, Ray Ebersole has streamlined some of his process by leveraging the great power and efficiency of PowerShell. He had to update some software across 37 servers and instead of running through each one […]

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