Happy Holidays


As our family watches Santa on the NORAD site, gets his milk and cookies along with the Reindeer food I want to wish everyone a happy and healthy Holiday Season.

 

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PowerShell: Simple Profile


I’ve read a lot of different posts, articles and listened to any different Power Users tell me how to set up my PS profile. What I have seen is that a lot, if not most people want to trick up their profile adding all kinds of cool things that just increase the load time of the PowerShell console. You can import modules when you need them, you can update help when you need it. You get my point.

I believe simple is better, including just enough to make it work and that’s not much at all. Lets see what I have in my PS profile:

set-location c:\Powershell
$a = (Get-Host).PrivateData
$a.ErrorForegroundColor = “green”
cls

Four lines, that’s it, but what do they do?

  1. set-location “Path” Just drops me in my PowerShell folder that all my scripts are in.
  2. $a = (Get-Host).PrivateData sets a variable so that I can change colors by accessing the ChildObject PrivateData to assign a different color to different things in the PS window.
  3. $a.ErrorForegroundColor = “green” uses the $a to add the ErrorForegroundColor so that I can assign it a value of  green. You can do more with assigning cmdlets to variables but that isn’t the lesson here.
  4. cls is because I like a a clean workspace while I work.

That’s my whole profile. Nothing spectacular, or even ingenious. I just want to get working and I hate the RED error messages. Green looks so much better.

green-error

 

PowerShell: Get Computer Software and Version


Something that I have found useful in getting a hard copy of is a computers installed software, vendor and version. Today I’m just going to work with the local computer. In another post I will talk about the ability to get all software installed on a group of computers. In PowerShell there are a few ways to do what I am going to show you. The one I prefer is Get-CimInstance. I use this over Get-WMIObject becasue it gets me more information and Get-WMIObject is actually the older way from PS 2.0. It has really been replaced with Get-CimInstance. If you go to Introduction to CIM Cmdlets (MSDN Blog) you will find this quote:

“Getting/Enumerating instance of a class is the most commonly performed operation. We wanted the new Get-CimInstance Cmdlet to have better performance and even better user experience as compared to the old Get-WmiObject cmdlet. To achieve these goals we made the following design decisions:”

So, how do I write the code?

Get-ciminstance Win32_Product

or

Gcim Win32_Product (gcim is the alias for Get-Ciminstance)

That just spits out the information in the ugly format below:

PS_Capture

I like my data so I can read it properly and with all the data I really want. Lets add a Piped command:

| Format-Table name, version, vendor

This gives you the results below:

PS_Capture1

Okay, so that’s nice, but how about in a CSV file that I can print or look at later? Cool, lets do it:

Gcim Win32_Product | Select-Object name, version, vendor | Export-Csv C:\software1.csv

I know, your saying wait you changed the second line from Format-Table to Select-Object and you would be correct. Why did I change it, well format-Table is for output to the console, not for something you are piping to Export-CSV. You have to Select the Objects you want to send to the CSV file to get proper data. Go ahead and try to use the Format-Table once to see you get nothing you can use in the CSV file. The output you get when you use the Select-Object is below. That’s how I would like it, how about you?

PS_Capture3